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FILM GUIDE ARCHIVE FEATURE DOCUMENTARY

SHAKESPEARE WAS A BIG GEORGE JONES FAN: COWBOY JACK CLEMENT'S HOME MOVIES

TFF 2005
FILM GUIDE ARCHIVE SHAKESPEARE WAS A BIG GEORGE JONES FAN: COWBOY JACK CLEMENT'S HOME MOVIES [TFF 2005]
In this most unorthodox documentary about a most unorthodox man, "Cowboy" Jack Clement comes alive as a maverick entrepreneur and madcap jester of the country music industry. Jack Clement began working at Sun Records for Sam Phillips, who made music history when he made a record of a white guy who sounded like a black guy-Elvis Presley. Soon Clement did something similar, producing 20 gold records for Charley Pride, a black guy who sounded white. He went on to produce and write songs for some of the biggest names on the Grand Ole Opry stage, from Johnny Cash to Dolly Parton to George Jones. And became friends with many of them. But Clement not only had the friendships, he documented them on film and video- for decades. The footage of a relaxed Cash, caught in private moments with one of his best friends, is worth the price of admission (as is the footage of Bono doing his Brando impersonation). Over those years, Clement made millions-and lost them just as easily, usually by investing in some harebrained scheme like producing a horror film called Dear Dead Delilah. And again, Clement documented the whole damn thing. Directors Morgan Neville and Robert Gordon combine thirty years of Clement's home movies with new footage and offbeat asides for one of the liveliest documentaries about one of the liveliest talents ever to be captured on screen.
Interests
Documentary, Music
In this most unorthodox documentary about a most unorthodox man, "Cowboy" Jack Clement comes alive as a maverick entrepreneur and madcap jester of the country music industry. Jack Clement began working at Sun Records for Sam Phillips, who made music history when he made a record of a white guy who sounded like a black guy-Elvis Presley. Soon Clement did something similar, producing 20 gold records for Charley Pride, a black guy who sounded white. He went on to produce and write songs for some of the biggest names on the Grand Ole Opry stage, from Johnny Cash to Dolly Parton to George Jones. And became friends with many of them. But Clement not only had the friendships, he documented them on film and video- for decades. The footage of a relaxed Cash, caught in private moments with one of his best friends, is worth the price of admission (as is the footage of Bono doing his Brando impersonation). Over those years, Clement made millions-and lost them just as easily, usually by investing in some harebrained scheme like producing a horror film called Dear Dead Delilah. And again, Clement documented the whole damn thing. Directors Morgan Neville and Robert Gordon combine thirty years of Clement's home movies with new footage and offbeat asides for one of the liveliest documentaries about one of the liveliest talents ever to be captured on screen.
Film Information
Year: 2005
Length: 58 minutes
Language: English
Country: USA
Premiere: New York
Special Note

About the Director(s)
Acclaimed writer/director/producer Robert Gorder is the author of a number of books on Memphis music. His film credits include the Grammy-nominated documentary Muddy Waters Can't Be Satisfied, The Road to Memphis, and Musicians' Memories of Beale Street. He lives in Memphis, Tennessee with his wife and two daughters and has managed for nearly two decades to avoid jobs that would have him in rush hour traffic. Morgan Neville is a documentary filmmaker who specializes in cultural and historical subjects. His first documentary was the award-winning feature Shotgun Freeway Drives thru Lost LA, an examination of the history of Los Angeles. His film Muddy Waters Can't Be Satisfied recently aired on PBS and was nominated for a 2003 Grammy. He is currently completing production on Hank Williams's Honky Tonk Blues.

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