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2017 FILM GUIDE

SHOWING 20 RESULTS | FILMS IN THE SECTION 'AWARDS SCREENINGS'
Medium tff17 laurel maysles
Award Screening: Albert Maysles Award for Best New Documentary Director: A Suitable Girl

Dipti, Amrita and Ritu are all young, modern women in India looking to get married—some desperately, some reluctantly. A Suitable Girl follows them over the course of four years as they juggle family, career and friends, intimately capturing their thoughts on arranged marriage, giving them a voice, and offering a unique perspective into the nuances of this institution. | Read More
Medium tff17 laurel audiencedocfirst
Award Screening: Audience Award, Documentary First Place: Hondros

Beginning with the war in Kosovo in 1999, award-winning photographer Chris Hondros served as a witness to conflict for over a decade before being killed in Libya in 2011. In Hondros, director and childhood friend Greg Campbell creates a portrait of a man with not only great depth and sensitivity, but a passion for his craft, and an unending talent for creating breathtaking imagery. Executive produced by Jake Gyllenhaal. | Read More
Medium tff17 laurel audiencedocsecond
Award Screening: Audience Award, Documentary Second Place: Shadowman

In the early 1980s, Richard Hambleton was New York City’s precursor to Banksy, a rogue street artist whose silhouette paintings haunted the sides of Manhattan buildings. Like so many other geniuses of his time, he fell victim to drug addiction, even as his work continued to rise in both demand and value. Shadowman doubles as both a time capsule of a forgotten New York City era, and a redemption story. | Read More
Medium tff17 laurel audiencenarrfirst
Award Screening: Audience Award, Narrative First Place: The Divine Order

Political leaders in Switzerland cited ‘Divine Order’ as the reason why women still did not have the right to vote as late as 1970. Director Petra Volpe explores this surprising history through the story of Nora, a quiet housewife from a quaint village searching for the fierce suffragette leader inside her. | Read More
Medium tff17 laurel audiencenarrsecond
Award Screening: Audience Award, Narrative Second Place: Saturday Church

14-year-old Ulysses is a shy and effeminate teen being raised in the Bronx by his strict Aunt Rose. He finds escape in a rich fantasy life of music and dance, and soon with a vibrant transgender youth community called Saturday Church. Damon Cardasis’ directorial debut is a rousing celebration of one boy’s search for his identity. | Read More
Medium tff17 laurel bestactorintlnarr
Award Screening: Best Actor, International Narrative Competition: Nobody's Watching

Nico is a promising actor in Argentina, but in New York, nobody takes notice. After giving up a successful career in his home country for a chance to make it in the big apple, Nico finds himself bartending, babysitting and doing odd jobs to keep afloat. In a moving depiction of the vibrant city, director Julia Solomonoff’s touching feature questions how we adjust when we lose our audience. | Read More
Medium tff17 laurel bestactorusnarr
Award Screening: Best Actor, US Narrative Competition: One Percent More Humid

Catherine (Julia Garner) and Iris (Juno Temple) are childhood friends home from college for a hot New England summer. As they attempt to enjoy parties and skinny-dipping and the usual vacation hijinks, a shared trauma in their past becomes increasingly difficult to suppress. As the wedge between the friends grows, they each pursue forbidden affairs to cope. | Read More
Medium tff17 laurel bestactressintlnarr
Award Screening: Best Actress, International Narrative Competition: The Divine Order

Political leaders in Switzerland cited ‘Divine Order’ as the reason why women still did not have the right to vote as late as 1970. Director Petra Volpe explores this surprising history through the story of Nora, a quiet housewife from a quaint village searching for the fierce suffragette leader inside her. | Read More
Medium tff17 laurel bestactressusnarr
Award Screening: Best Actress, US Narrative Competition: Blame

Abigail (Quinn Shephard) is an outcast who seeks solace in fantasy worlds. When high school drama teacher Jeremy (Chris Messina) casts her in Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, Abigail’s confidence blooms. But soon her relationship with Jeremy begins to move beyond innocent flirtation, and it in turn fuels a classmate's vengeful jealousy that quickly spirals out of control and brings about a chain of events that draws parallels to Salem. | Read More
Medium tff17 laurel cinematographydoc
Award Screening: Best Cinematography, Documentary Competition: Bobbi Jene

In her moving and cinematic documentary, Elvira Lind follows American dancer Bobbi Jene Smith as she makes the decision of a lifetime. Bobbi returns to the U.S., leaving behind a loving boyfriend and a successful 10-year run as a star dancer of the famous Israeli dance company Batsheva. Lind intimately portrays Bobbi’s rigorous creative process as she starts fresh in San Francisco, while still working to maintain a long-distance relationship. | Read More

RUSH SALES POLICY

When tickets for a screening or event are no longer available, they will be listed as RUSH. The Rush system functions as a stand-by line that will form at the venue approximately 45 minutes prior to scheduled start time. Admittance is based on availability and will begin 15 minutes prior to program start time. Rush Tickets are the same price as advance tickets payable upon entry. There is a limit of one Rush Ticket per person.